Masahito Hitosugi,Takeshi Koseki,Yuka Kinugasa,Tomokazu Hariya,Genta Maeda,Yasuki Motozawa.[J].中华创伤杂志英文版,2017,20(6):343-346
Seatbelt paths of the pregnant women sitting in the rear seat of a motor vehicle
  
DOI:
KeyWord: Pregnant womenRear seatSeatbeltAnthropometryMotor vehicles
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Author NameAffiliation
Masahito Hitosugi Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192, Japan 
Takeshi Koseki Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192, Japan 
Yuka Kinugasa Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192, Japan 
Tomokazu Hariya Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192, Japan 
Genta Maeda Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192, Japan 
Yasuki Motozawa Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192, Japan 
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Abstract:
      Purpose: Seatbelt use during pregnancy is important to improve maternal and fetal survival after motor vehicle collisions. However, because the rear seatbelt of a motor vehicle tends to make contact with the neck, even if it is adequately used, some pregnant women sitting in the rear seat opt not to fasten the belt. The purpose of this study is to explore seatbelteneck contact for pregnant women sitting in the rear seat of a motor vehicle. Methods: We carried out an anthropometric study. Japanese women who were 30 weeks pregnant (n = 12) sat in the left side of the rear seat of a typical mid-size passenger sedan and fastened the seatbelt. Seating posture was investigated by measuring the coordinates of the anthropometric data points of the pregnant women (head, shoulder, hip joint, and knee joint). The belt path was analyzed by measuring the clearance between the belt and the sternum or navel. Results: Among the 12 pregnant women at 33.9 week ± 3.3 week gestation, the shoulder belt deviated to the right side and subsequently contacted to the neck in four pregnant women (Contact group). The height of the Contact group was significantly shorter than that of Non-contact group (152.3 cm ± 3.0 cm vs. 159.0 cm ± 3.3 cm, p = 0.008). Regarding the relative position of the seatbelt to the subject's body, the distances from the top of the sternum to the center of the shoulder belt were significantly shorter in Contact group (3.9 cm ± 3.5 cm) than that in the Non-contact group (8.0 cm ± 1.6 cm, p = 0.03). However, no significant difference was found for the distance from the umbilicus to the center of the lap belt. Conclusion: Our findings show that because of short height and late term of pregnancy with protrusion of the abdomen, the shoulder belt deviates to the right or left, avoiding the protruded uterus, and subsequently makes contact with the neck. Seatbelt systems for rear seats need to be developed to improve passenger safety, especially for pregnant women.
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