Chitta Ranjan Mohanty,Mantu Jain,Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan,Prabeer Chandra Mohanty,Ritesh panda.[J].中华创伤杂志英文版,2020,23(4):243-248
Tropical cyclone Fanieperspective from the trauma and emergency department of an affected tertiary hospital
  
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KeyWord: Natural disastersTropical cycloneMultiple traumaTertiary care
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Author NameAffiliation
Chitta Ranjan Mohanty Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India 
Mantu Jain Department of Orthopedics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India 
Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan College of Nursing, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India 
Prabeer Chandra Mohanty Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India 
Ritesh panda Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India 
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Abstract:
      Purpose: To explore the epidemiological and clinical profile of patients admitted to the trauma and emergency department (TED) of a tertiary care hospital due to tropical cyclone Fani and highlight the challenges faced by the hospital in this natural disaster. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in the TED in the affected zone. Data of all victims affected by the cyclone Fani on May 3, 2019 were obtained from disaster records and medical case sheets. All patients except death on admission were included. Clinical variables included anatomical sites and severity of injuries which was assessed by revised trauma score (RTS) and injury severity score (ISS). Trauma injury severity score (TRISS) was also calculated. Results: Of 75 patients, 74 were included and the other one was brought dead and thus excluded. The age, median ± interquartile range (IQ), was 41.0 (27.7-53.0) years. The male to female ratio was 2:1. Most of the wounded were transported by the police control room vans on day 1: first 10 h, 50.0%; 10-24 h, 20.3%. The median ± IQ range of RTS, ISS and TRISS were 20 (14-28), 7.84 (7.841-7.841), and 97.4 (91.6-98.9), respectively. Simple external injury was the dominant injury type. Polytrauma (ISS >15) was seen in 67% cases and spine injury in 14% cases (7% cervical and 7% thoracolumbar). Injury causes included sharp flying objects (broken pieces of glasses and asbestos) in 31% cases, followed by fall of trees in 20.3%. Twenty-four patients were discharged after primary treatment, 30 admitted to the indoor-trauma ward or intensive care unit and 20 deferred or transferred to another center. There was no in-house mortality. Challenges were related to electricity failure, mobile network breakdown, infrastructure collapse, and delay in expertise repair from outside due to airport/railway closure. Conclusion: In cyclonic storm like Fani, sharp flying objects, fall of trees/poles and collapsing walls constitute the common mode of injuries causing harm to more than one body regions. Polytrauma was seen in the majority of patients though external injury was the commonest. The affected hospital had the uphill task of treating hospitalized patients as well as disaster victims.
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